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How To Build A Micro Niche Site That Makes Money From Day 1!

So I’ve got another fun little experiment to share with you guys today.

A while ago I heard about the idea of a “micro-niche site”, and a few months back I finally decided to build one. Not for any particular reason – out of procrastination more than anything. But it turned out to be a pretty fun project.

As you know I’m always interested in new ways to build a life on the road, and along with blogging, freelancing, travel jobs, and the many other random ways to make money, this seemed like another interesting thing to try.

For those of you ready for a new pet project, below is my complete guide on how to build a micro niche site from scratch. I’m going to share the whole process with you, including the site itself, how I built it, and how much money it’s made. To be honest it wasn’t even very successful, but I’m certain many of you will be capable of building way cooler sites of your own. This guide should give you all the info you need to get it done.

What is a micro niche site?

A niche site is just a fancy name for a website about a specific topic. For example, you might make a website all about school snacks for kids. You could post recipes or snack ideas or research on which snacks have the most sugar – whatever you want.

A micro niche site is just a more narrowed down version of that. For example, you might build a site about school snacks for kid’s with allergies (or vegetarians or diabetes).

Not the greatest example but hopefully you get what I’m saying.

The overall idea of the site is to give information to people about a very specific topic. Because your site is so niche, it makes it easier for people to find you.

How to build a micro niche site

As you know I like to keep things super simple around here, so I broke down the process into 4 simple steps. To build a micro niche site you need to:

  1. Get a website up and running (duh).
  2. Choose a good niche.
  3. Write a bunch of helpful articles (keyword: helpful).
  4. Get traffic to the site.

That’s really it.

The best thing about it is how low-risk it is. You can do it from your bedroom, you don’t need to take a course or study anything (because you’ll be writing about something you already know) and it should cost you around $100 to get started. To start a mini-business that could make you a passive income from anywhere? That’s pretty cool.

My micro niche site took maybe 30 hours to get to the current stage (I wasn’t really counting). I didn’t take any courses on how to build a micro niche site or buy any books about it. I just read a few blog posts and tried it. Now it only takes me an hour a month to maintain and has already made a tiny bit of money. Nothing I’ll be able to retire on, but has paid back my investment in the first two months and will be profitable this year.

I didn’t really go into it expecting that, so that’s nice! We’ll get to all those details a little later though.

Let’s go through the process step-by-step:


1. Get a website up and running

If you haven’t owned a website before, this step may sound complicated. It’s actually super easy (shouldn’t take more than an hour).

Getting your micro niche site up and running requires 3 things:

  1. Choosing a web host
  2. Installing WordPress
  3. Installing a theme

All super simple steps – I’ll walk you through them.

Setting up your web hosting account

Getting hosting is like renting a piece of land on the internet where your website will sit. Without hosting space, you can’t own a site. Luckily web hosting is super affordable these days and even ten year olds can afford to have their own blogs.

While there are thousands of web hosts to choose from, not all of them are good. And if you are going to start a website, trust me, you want a good host. I can’t stress that enough. A bad host where your site always crashes and is slow and the support team never answers your emails – it’s hell and you might as well not have a website at all.

I’ve been a site owner for around 5 years now, have been with many hosts, and there is only one host I recommend: Siteground.

Here’s why:

  • They have the best support in the industry, period! You can get someone on chat within 10 minutes, and they’re super geeky and actually know what they’re doing. Compared to bigger hosts, where I’ve waited over an hour and got some ding dong who knows nothing.
  • If your site goes down, they get you back online quick smart. I’m talking within minutes, not the next day. I’ve had hosts that left my site down for 72 hours before doing anything!
  • It’s affordable. Most big hosts make you sign up for a 3 year commitment to get their best rate, forcing you to pay hundreds up front. Siteground only requires a one year subscription, meaning you can started for about $60. At a lot of the more popular hosts you’ll be forking out $150+ up front.

Of course feel free to choose any host you like, but again Siteground is the only host I’ll recommend. They cost about the same as other “cheap” hosts but service is far superior and being a site owner with them is completely stress free. All my sites are hosted with them.

If you’d like to get your micro niche site rolling, you can set up your account in just a few minutes on their start up page. You’ll be ready to start building in less than an hour. If you’re new to this and require a guide to getting your web hosting set up, I’ve put one together below.  Just click the orange link to open it.

+ Setting up a website with Siteground (click to open)

Getting set up with Siteground shouldn’t take you more than a few minutes. If you click here you’ll get taken to their different hosting plans, which should look like this:

For a micro niche site you will only need their “Startup” plan. This is the cheapest plan and all new customers get a 60% discount which works out to $3.95/month – less than $50 a year. You’ll get 10GB of storage space, one-click WordPress install, free daily backups and bandwidth suited for 10,000 visits per month. To be hosted on Siteground quality servers, that’s very good value and for a micro niche site there’s no way you’ll need anything more than that!

Choose your domain

After you choose your plan you’ll get taken to the next step which is domain registration:

Simply enter the domain you want and check it’s available.

How do you choose a domain name?

For a micro niche site the domain is actually not wildly important.

A good guideline is to take your topic and add the words “my, best or just” at the start or “reviews, HQ, online” at the end. As an example, if your site was about coconut oil, you could call it coconutoilHQ.com or justcoconutoils.com. The keyword here is more important than coming up with a fancy brandable name.

Whatever you decide, your domain will be confirmed and you’ll get taken to the next screen.

Enter your details and extra services

Next you’ll be asked to fill in your personal details, such as name and address, and your payment details. You’ll notice that you can get the discounted rates for 1 year, 2 year or 3 year signups. This is quite different to most hosts who only offer their discount rates for their longest terms. Paying 3 years up front with any service is quite a commitment, so it’s cool that Siteground lets you get the best price even for a one-year signup.

You’ll also get asked if you want to purchase extra services. None of these are really necessary, but of course you can get them if you want.

Finally, click the Pay Now button to confirm everything.

That’s it! You’ve got a home on the web.

Installing WordPress

WordPress is the most popular website software in the world. If you want a fast, secure, nicely designed website, use WordPress. Everyone does. Best of all, it’s 100% free.

The other great thing about WordPress is it’s super simple to use. No nerdy stuff, no weird programming or coding. Just install and go.

If you’re hosting with Siteground installing WordPress is as simple as 2 clicks. I’ve got a short guide showing you how to do that below (just click the orange link).

+ Installing WordPress (click to open)

First, log in to your control panel with the details Siteground should have emailed to you. You should get shown this screen (if you’re with another host it might be different, but search for the WordPress icon in your control panel. If they have a wizard it will be there!):

wordpress

Select the option “Get WordPress preinstalled on this account.” You’ll then get asked to enter some details for your WordPress backend, which will look like this:

wordpresssetup

Nothing fancy here. Just enter your email and choose a username and password. These will be the details you use every time you log in to work on your site (write them down!) Following that you’ll get asked to select a WordPress theme:

themes

Just choose whichever one you want (you can always change it later, it’s super easy). Then hit submit and you’re done! You now have a WordPress site ready to rumble.

Installing a theme

Now, your WordPress theme.

A theme is like a pre-made design for your website. Instead of paying a web designer thousands of dollars to design a pretty website for you, you can just install a WordPress theme with one click and your site will look great. This is perfect for dummies like you and me 🙂

If this is your first website, I’m going to recommend that you don’t buy a theme right away. You’re probably going to spend days shopping through different themes, and it will just be a distraction from the more important tasks. There are millions of free themes you can use in the meantime. Once you’ve written some articles and you have a better idea of how you want the site to look, you can look at investing in a theme. You can install themes on your site instantly with one click without losing anything, so no need to worry about it so early.

Of course if you want to buy a theme straight away that’s fine too. Whenever you choose to buy, I would highly recommend using a Genesis theme from Studiopress. They are perfect for micro-niche sites (fast, secure, designed well for search engines). I would suggest using either Foodie Pro or Pretty Chic. I have sites on both those themes and they’re super easy to use and customise. The micro niche site I’m about to introduce you to is built on Pretty Chic.


2. Choosing a micro-niche

Now that you’re all set up we can work on building the site itself.

First, your micro niche. What’s your site going to be about?

There are two things to think about here:

  1. Is it a subject you are knowledgeable/passionate about?
  2. Is it a subject other people are searching for online?

To help you with this I’ll tell you about my own micro-niche. There’s a little backstory here:

A while ago I had a big rash on my leg. I grew up with bad eczema so I figured it was just a flare up – the insane stress of blogger life maybe, no big deal. But then it started getting really red, so I went to the doc. He looked at my skin and told me the bad news: Scabies.

If you don’t know what scabies are, it’s a skin parasite that burrows under the top layer of the skin. It’s not a killer parasite like malaria or giardia, but holy crap are they annoying. I’ve no idea where I got it – probably from jiu jitsu, but anyway.

The doc gives me some scabies cream and tells me to smother it on, it’ll be gone overnight. I think cool, no biggie.

However, the cream doesn’t work the first time, and I’m kind of a hypochondriac. So I freak out a little bit.

I spend the next two weeks reading absolutely everything I can about scabies on the web – the history, all the different treatments, all the horror stories, some people saying they’ve had it for 5 years and want to kill themselves. Now I’m thinking shit, I’m going to die from scabies. So after a few days I decide to go full pioneer. I read all the studies, take notes, read up all these weird plants and oils, try all the treatments, smother different concotions all over my body. A week later I’m cured.

A few days later I’m writing up an email to my doctor about all the research I did, and I figure this information should really be public. Especially since all my Google searches had just come back with people crying “Waa I’m dying” and other stupid stuff.

Since not everyone has the time to be reading through pages of scabies studies like I did, I figured I could summarise it all and give people answers to treat scabies properly. Surely a site like that could be really valuable to people.

So that’s the long story of how I became an armchair expert on scabies and decided on my micro-niche site: Scabies Home Remedies. Not the most glamourous subject, but definitely an important one.

Now that’s probably not a great example of choosing a micro-niche, because it sounds like you need to go through some weird experience like that which is not the case at all. I actually had about 7 or 8 micro niche ideas, but I just chose scabies because it was (a) on my mind at the time, and (b) felt like the easiest the subject to write about. Also there probably weren’t many other sites to compete with, because who the hell wants to write about scabies…

The truth is, you can get a good micro niche out of any subject (yes, any). Games, parenting, fishing, avocados, BB guns. Seriously, anything. Try and think about an experience that caused you to start researching/buying new things, or a particular problem that you needed information on recently. If you actually had trouble finding information, even better! Since a good site doesn’t exist yet, you can make it.

Here are a few idea starters for you:

  • What is something you have bought online recently?
  • What is something you purchased at the store recently?
  • What is a question you have asked a friend for advice on recently?
  • What is something you cook/make often? (niche recipe sites are excellent).
  • What is something you’ve typed into Google recently?
  • What is an item you spent a lot of time researching/shopping for?
  • What was something that stressed you out recently that you needed help with?
  • What is something you’ve bought that has made your life easier?
  • What is something your friends are really into or spend a lot of money on?

If you bought a juicer recently, you could make a juice recipes site, even micro niche it down further into specific juices. If your kids are playing with new toys or games you could build a site around toys for “insert blank”. There really are endless possibilities. Take thirty minutes to jot down some ideas of things that you’ve experienced/are knowledgeable about/are interested in. Write down everything – there are no wrong answers. In the next step, we’ll help decide which one is a winner.

Validating your micro niche. Is it a site people want to read?

Now you’ve thought of a niche(s), we need to see if people are actually interested in it.

Are there enough people searching for your niche to make a site worthwhile?

Luckily, Google has a free tool where you can type in a subject and see how many people are searching for it. Frikkin perfect.

Now the following process might sound a little heavy. If it confuses you, don’t worry. Once you start doing it I’m sure it will start to make sense.

So in my example, we want to find out how many people are searching for stuff about scabies on the webs. If only 500 people per month are searching for scabies information, probably not a great niche idea since nobody is interested it. However if it’s getting many thousands or millions of searches per month, we could be in luck.

Here’s what Google shows:

keyword research for building micro niche site

100k-1 million searches per month. That’s cool. Makes sense too – it’s one of the oldest ailments known to humans.

But it is unlikely I’m going to rank highly in the Google search results for a term as broad as “scabies”. You’ll be competing with the Wikipedias and WebMDs of the world.

Instead, it would make more sense to focus on long-tail keywords, or niche keywords.

An example might be, “How to treat scabies with tea tree oil” or “How to kill scabies with natural treatments”. When people Google search those specific terms, it’s less likely that many sites have targeted those phrases, giving your micro niche site a better chance of ranking.

Ideally we want low competition keywords with good search volume. Luckily the Google keyword planner will suggest many keyword phrases for you. Here are some suggestions for scabies:

keyword research for building micro niche site

Now for a micro niche site you don’t need a shit ton of search traffic, but you still want as much as possible. 1,000 searches a month would be a minimum. That means 1,000 people are going into Google typing that search term, meaning 1,000 potential visitors to your site. If you can target 10+ keyword phrases, that’s a decent amount of potential traffic.

Then look at the competition. If the competition is high, it means a lot of sites are targeting that keyword. You’ll have a hard time ranking highly in Google search results. If competition is low, you have a better chance of landing on the first page and being found.

To do this research I actually use a software called Market Samurai. While this makes things easier, remember you can do all your research with free online tools such as Google’s Keyword Planner. Software like Market Samurai just saves you a lot of time (you can get a free trial here).

The reason I use Market Samurai is it provides much more information. For example, it shows you the sites that are actually on the first page for that search term, so you can see who you’re competing with, how old those sites are, and gives you more detailed search numbers. For example, this is what comes up when you analyze the search term “how to treat scabies”:

Now I won’t go and explain all those columns for you, but basically red means very competitive (bad) and green means not competitive at all (green). Obviously we want to compete for words with low competition, so we want a lot of green in that table. This search term has quite a bit of red, so it’s not a keyword phrase I decided to target.

You can also see I’d be competing with sites like Healthline and Mayo Clinic which are super established – that will be difficult.

After spending about 4-5 hours on this I did find some great low competition/high search volume keywords, which are the phrases I’ve targeted in my articles.

A quick note about keyword research: It’s not everything!

Some say good keyword research is everything in niche sites and if you can’t find many good keywords you should abort and choose a different subject. I disagree. I think the most important thing is you actually enjoy writing and learning about your niche. For me building a micro-niche site is not a job – it’s something you do on the side – a fun little challenge, like building a model airplane. If you make some money, great, but if not it should still be enjoyable.

The other, more important reason is, search stats change all the time. Maybe what you’re writing about isn’t popular today but it might be in 12 months from now. So as long as you’re writing about a subject you love and find interesting, then go ahead and make the site. In a few years maybe every 18 year old will be searching for your niche, and guess who’s site will be popping up first on Google? Your cool established micro niche site, of course. The truth is, if you’re interested in this niche, there’s bound to be other people in the world interested in it too.

Like I said, this should be enjoyable. Just choose a topic you love and have fun with it.


3. Write quality articles for your micro niche site

There are two types of articles you will need to write for your micro niche site:

  1. Two or three epic, in-depth, expert articles on your subject (1,500 words plus).
  2. A collection of smaller articles to publish regularly (500+ words).

For example, one of my cornerstone articles is How To Get Rid Of Scabies: The Ultimate Guide. Super well researched, lots of cited studies, super high quality.

I have about three of those types of articles.

All the other articles are minor, less important articles. “How to stop scabies itching at night”. Stuff like that. Why do you need to publish these smaller articles?

  1. To show Google your site is being constantly updated (Google loves this).
  2. To target the less popular keywords and bring more people to your site.

Now to keep publishing content you’re going to need a lot of article ideas. I’ll recommend at least 25.

Why 25?

Because that gives you enough content to publish an article every week for six months. Ideally you want to post more often than that, but if you can only manage once a week that’s fine. You can even write all 25 articles now and schedule them for the next 25 weeks. That will be a good time-frame to gauge whether your site is going to be profitable. After six months you can decide whether you’re going to continue and can work on your next 25.

Now you might be thinking 25 articles is a lot, but it really isn’t. If we take my site for example, I’ve got all the usual articles like:

“What are the symptoms of scabies”
“How to treat scabies”
“The best natural treatments for scabies”

Yadda yadda. Those were the obvious topics and I came up with maybe 10 of them. But remember, not all articles need to be 1,000 words long and super detailed.

I went back into my search history and looked at all the things I searched for when I was dealing with scabies. I had typed in things like:

“Can you get scabies from the gym?”
“Can you get scabies from jiu jitsu?”

Ding. Those are two more article ideas I can add to the list. That led to all kinds of other possibilities like:

“Can you get scabies from a spa pool?”
“Can you get scabies from a massage?”

Just think of the types of things people will be typing into Google. Another hack is to find another site about your niche, and steal a few article ideas (obviously don’t copy the actual article, rewrite it in your own words and try to make it better).

Remember your 2 or 3 cornerstone articles will account for 90% of your traffic. The main purpose of the other articles is to build credibility with Google and show your site is active. That means you can really post anything – answers to specific questions, some random thoughts on your niche etc. Even if the post is only 500 words, that’s fine too. No need to spend a lot of time on them!

As for scheduling, I would suggest publishing your “epic” content straight away, and then just publish one article per week. If you’re not a fast writer this could be time intensive, however, only the initial cornerstone content should take a long time to write. The first few articles I wrote took more than an hour each, but now I’ve done all the big detailed guides, the shorter articles I write only take 15 minutes. That’s 15 minutes a week, or an hour a month! So it definitely gets much easier, just grind it out at the start.

Remember to target your keywords!

To get found in Google, you need to target keywords in your articles. All that means is putting key phrases in your articles so Google knows what you’re writing about.

For example, if someone searches for “best vegetarian snacks for kids”, Google goes and scans the web for a relevant article. Obviously if your article has the phrase “best vegetarian snacks for kids” in it several times, Google will pick it up as relevant and return it to the searcher. So you want to make sure you’re targeting all those low-competition keyword phrases we uncovered in the previous step (that’s why we researched them, duh).

For a practical standpoint, this simply means including the keyword phrase within the body of your article 3 or 4 times, preferably near the start. You can also try and put the phrase in the URL of the article, and also the article title itself.

SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) is a lot more complicated than that, but that should set you on the right path for now. If you’re new to this, I don’t really recommend geeking out on SEO right away – it’s heavy and will take the fun out of everything. What I’ve told you above is enough to get started. Focus on getting your site up and targeting keywords in your articles. We can worry about the super geeky stuff later.


4. Getting traffic to your site

This is easily the most difficult and least enjoyable part of the process. Why? Because so much of the advice out there is scammy, secret tricks, “spam your website all over the internet” type stuff. This is why I haven’t really done that much traffic generation, but of course it’s a necessary part of the building your site.

Now one source of traffic we’re going to rely on is Google, but this doesn’t happen instantly. Because your site is new, Google doesn’t know whether it’s good or not. Usually gaining traction in Google takes around 6 months or more.

That’s okay, in the steps above we’ve set ourselves up for Google success in the long term. But we also want to get results from Day 1, remember?

Here are some traffic sources that will help us do that:

Facebook – If your site is about one of your hobbies, and it’s something people often ask you about, you can share your stuff on your Facebook page. Obviously treating scabies isn’t a hobby of mine and not something I think everyone wants to hear about, so I didn’t bother.

Pinterest – This is actually a really great tool for promoting your site. I would recommend starting a new Pinterest account for your site, make some professional looking pins in Picmonkey and then start sharing them. You can share on your personal Pinterest too. Pinterest has been my main traffic driver so far.

Youtube – You can rank videos super easily in Youtube. If you do a specific title like “How to treat scabies with tea tree oil” you’ll probably rank on the first page within a day. However the challenge is actually making a good video that people will watch. I just uploaded a crappy Powerpoint presentation and it ranked almost instantly, but never drove any traffic. At this stage I don’t think I’ll be investing any time making a proper video, but if this was more than just a side experiment I’d definitely consider it.

Quora – Lots of people ask questions on Quora all the time, like “I dropped my iPhone in jelly will it still work?” If you search for questions like this related to your micro-niche, you can then post an answer and link back to your site. It’s a rather untapped resource that you should definitely check out.

Reddit – There is most likely a subreddit related to your niche. Post your articles up there, you might be surprised.

Forums – Always a great place to promote your site. If anyone has questions related to your niche, answer them and then direct them to a relevant article on your site. Great way to build backlinks too.

Stumble Upon – Super easy to use – just submit your pages and see how they do.

I would choose 1 or 2 sources to start with and focus on those. If you see any success keep going, and if you don’t, try something else. Which one is most effective really depends on your promotion style and the niche itself, so just keep trying.

Just for reference, here’s what my site traffic has looked like in the 2.5 months since going live:

how to build a micro niche site

And here’s what my referrals look like:

getting traffic to your micro niche site

As you can see Pinterest is the clear leader. I’ve also been getting a bit of traffic from search engines already, which is nice and hopefully will grow as the site gets older. Honestly two months is still early days, so if you’re struggling with traffic after that long, don’t flip out. Traffic generation takes time.

How to make money from your micro niche site?

Now you’ve got people visiting your site, we need to turn this traffic into dollars.

There are two main ways to make money from a micro-niche site. One is advertising, the other is affiliate marketing.

Monetising your micro-niche site with advertising

Advertising is most easily done through Google Adsense. Simply sign up for an account, enter your site details and if your site isn’t a spam factory you should be approved. Then you can start copy-pasting the ads up around your site. When a reader clicks one of those ads, you’ll usually earn between 10 and 50 cents. Simple.

The downside with advertising is it requires a lot of traffic before you see any results. To me, advertising is a more long term strategy for once your site and traffic matures.

Monetising your micro-niche site with affiliate marketing

If you want your site to make money from Day 1, I would suggest using affiliate marketing.

Affiliate marketing is when you earn a commission for recommending a product or service. You put a special link to a product on your site, then if someone clicks that link and makes a purchase, you get a commission.

If this is your first site, I’d recommend using the Amazon affiliate program.

How this works is you post affiliate links on your site for anything on Amazon (Amazon will provide the links for you). If your readers click that link and then buy something, Amazon will pay you commission of between 4-8%. The program is particularly great because their affiliate links are valid-store wide. That means if someone clicks a link for coconut oil on your site, but while on Amazon they end up purchasing a laptop, you’ll get commission for that too.

Once you get more familiar with building sites you can start looking at other, more lucrative programs, but Amazon is a great one to get started.

Other things to think about:

  • If your micro niche involves products people will need to buy (for example, if you made a site about coconut oil recipes your readers will obviously be buying coconut oil) it makes more sense to monetise with Amazon. Why? Because you can link to coconut oil (or whatever product) on Amazon and collect commissions.
  • If your micro niche is more informational and people generally won’t be buying things (for example, philosophy or meditation) then it makes more sense to monetise with Adsense.
  • Lastly: Make sure you build your site first before submitting an application for either Adsense or Amazon’s Associate program. Post some articles to your site and make it look full and active. When you apply, they are going to review your site to see if it fits their guidelines. This sounds daunting but it’s really not. As long as your site doesn’t look like shit and you’ve followed the guidelines you should have no trouble getting approved!

How much money did my site make?

Since my site was based around home remedies (lots of oils, powders, plant products etc) I included Amazon affiliate links to all those things in my articles, and people have been clicking them and buying them. At first I was pretty surprised that this was happening, but then I remembered when I was treating myself I was also ordering all the same things! The whole point of the site was to recommend people the same treatments that I used, so it made total sense in the end. The site was working exactly as I intended.

Here’s what the first couple of months looked like:

how to build a micro niche site

If you can’t read that, it means the site made $59.02 in its first two months. That doesn’t sound like a lot, but it’s actually more than this blog you’re reading now! (which made zero dollars in its first two months).

Having a site make money from its first month is actually quite rare. However, if you write good content and promote it with a monetisation plan in place, there’s no reason you can’t do it. Even if this site just chugs along making $60 every two months, that’s still $360 per year, with potential to go a lot higher. Pretty cool for a little side hustle you can put together in just a couple of weekends.

It’s also not uncommon for niche sites like this to be making $1,000+ per month after a bit of love and growth. I’m sure if I dedicate significant time to this site it could reach that level. For reasons I’ll share below I probably won’t do that, but if you want to build a serious niche site income stream it’s definitely possible!

Going forward

Maintaining a micro niche site requires two things:

  1. Promoting regularly.
  2. Publishing articles regularly.

Promoting can be as simple as sharing your articles on social media, answering some questions in a forum or leaving some comments on other websites.

Publishing articles regularly involves writing one article or more a week and scheduling it.

To be honest, I don’t think I’ll be doing much on this site going forward. It’s been fun building something new and seeing it make a little money, but obviously it’s not something I’m super passionate about. I’ll continue to invest one or two hours a month as long as I feel like it, but I’m planning on spending more time building another micro niche site that’s more in line with my interests.

Regardless I think this will be a good example for you to refer to and that’s why I’m sharing it here today: I really hope it will help you to get your own web empire off the ground!

Summary: Steps to build a micro niche site that makes money from Day 1

  1. Get a website set up. I use Siteground and highly recommend them.
  2. Choose your micro-niche. Try and choose something you’re knowledgeable/interested in.
  3. Think of 25 article ideas.
  4. Write 2-3 epic articles to start with (ultimate guides etc). Monetise with affiliate links. I recommend using Amazon Associates if this is your first site.
  5. Start promoting.
  6. Publish one article a week to keep search engines happy.
  7. Watch your site grow and collect your money!

It’s seriously that simple. There’s nothing intellectual or difficult about it. Just set aside the hours to do the tasks and you’ll have a micro niche site that makes money.

Most importantly: Have fun!

One last piece of advice I want to give to anyone trying this is don’t take it too seriously. People always say you need to treat your websites like a business and struggle struggle struggle etc. I disagree. It’s going to cost you maybe $50-$100 to get this thing going – there’s no risking your life savings here. Choose a subject you enjoy reading and writing about, say stupid things in your articles, swear if you want to, add stupid photos. There’s nothing worse than slaving over a site about some boring shit that reads like a high school textbook. Treat your new website like a video game and just have fun with it. Even if you only make $2 from it in the end, at least you learned something new and had a good time. And if you do genuinely enjoy what you’re doing, I promise you’ll make much more than that 🙂

Good luck!

Bren

P.S. I’m sure I missed a few things, so if you have questions leave em below!

Note: I want to let you all know that some of the items mentioned above, such as Siteground and Market Samurai, are affiliated links. That means I earn a commission for any referrals I make. Obviously I use all these services myself and recommend them because they’re excellent and I trust them! Not because of the small commissions I make. I encourage you to do your own homework and if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask. Good luck 🙂

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