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Study Chinese in China for a year…for free!

These days studying Chinese in China is like the new Macarena – everyone is doing it.

Students from literally every corner of the world, many of them fresh out of high school are laying down around $6,000 – $10,000 a year for housing and language tuition at Chinese universities.

But what if I told you there was a way to get all this for free?

Actually no, what if I told you there was a way to get paid to do this?

Well, there is. And thousands of students are doing it every year. I was one of them! Here’s how:

Every year the Chinese government offers scholarships to foreign nationals. The idea is that you are given a year’s free study in China, after which you will hopefully decide to stay and become a valuable member of their society (you know, get a job there and marry a Chinese girl and eat heaps of wontons. Mmmm). Even if you don’t, you’ll have spent a year learning Chinese which is good for the country anyway in the sense that the language and culture spreads around the world.

Typically the scholarship covers all university fees, all accommodation fees, health insurance, learning materials, around $250 to cover your initial visa/setup costs and then they pay you $275 a month for the whole year. All up, the entire gig was worth around $11,000 USD.

Now before you close this page and say “Brooo. C’mon! I never learned Chinese. I’m dumb. No one’s gonna give me no dang scholarship!” just hold the phone a second. When I applied, I could say about 10 words in Chinese. My career was not China-related (I was a NZ tax accountant). I didn’t get great grades in university. I was not a Chinese language student and I hadn’t met a single person on the scholarship council. I still applied and I still got accepted. 

There was one other NZ recipient studying at my university and she was also a beginner (we were in the same class). I’ve also already referred one friend who ended up landing a 2013 scholarship – also a beginner.

Don’t let the word ‘scholarship’ fool you. This isn’t an exclusive deal for smart people. The Chinese government set this whole thing up because it wants to give this money away. It wants people to learn Chinese and it wants foreigners to live in and discover their great country. Getting the scholarship is about presenting yourself as a worthy suitor, that’s it.

What I found most fascinating was the amount of students in China that just had no idea this opportunity existed. In my opinion, this is the best public study abroad opportunity I know of in the world today. It is not like other free opportunities where you get a “free” flight and “free” apartment, but with a little side deal that you have to teach English in some affiliated school for 6 hours a day. This is completely obligation free – no obligations before, no obligations after, no obligations during (other than attending class).

OK, so, the deets. Where and how do you apply?

Being the nice guy that I am, I went and harassed nicely asked 12 scholarship students from around the world about their scholarships and how they managed to get them. Hopefully the information here will point you in the right direction and allow you to study Chinese in China in the not too distant future!

Enjoy!

 

Brendan, New Zealand

Chinese level at the time of application?
Complete newbie.

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute at the University of Auckland

Studied at which university?
Fudan University.

What did the scholarship application process involve?
Had to write a letter stating the reasons I deserved the scholarship. Also needed references from two people, one needed to be a university professor.

Why do you think you got accepted?
I had been very involved in the Chinese community in New Zealand, and my references reflected that. I’m also Chinese, and made it very clear I was interested in learning more about my heritage.

What did the scholarship include?
A private room in the university dorms, all university fees, monthly allowance of 1,700RMB (~$275USD), free books, free health insurance, some free tours to other cities.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
A one page report after the scholarship detailing my experiences.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
1. I think all the application requirements are there to just weed out freeloaders. I think what it really comes down to is, do you want to learn Chinese? If so, can you prove it? Do you take language classes? Have you read any books on China? Do you have a Chinese language partner? If not, why are you even bothering to apply?

2. You will still need to ensure you meet all the requirements. For my particular scholarship you needed to be a NZ citizen, and I wasn’t. Therefore I needed to fast track a citizenship application before the scholarship deadline. You also needed to have been a university student within the last 5 years. If it’s been more than 5 years since you graduated, you may need to enrol in some university language courses and get your student ID back!

3. The make or break part of the application is your letter. You obviously want to learn Chinese, otherwise you wouldn’t be applying. So show that genuine interest and fascination with the country and the language. Most applicants are Chinese language students, so they sell themselves that way. That’s obviously not a good angle for me since I’m a Chinese illiterate. Instead, I made it clear that I couldn’t speak Chinese but I was very eager to live in the country and learn about my heritage (I’m Chinese blooded). I assured them I would take it very seriously and pass every exam (and I did!). I was very keen to learn the language and had been for a long time, so my references were able to vouch for that. Instead of focusing on my crappy Chinese I focused on my other achievements, i.e. my career, travels, community work etc. After they read your letter they need to be thinking “Yes! This is the type of guy we want to give this to.”

Best thing about living in China?
The crazy nightlife! And also the melting pot of cultures. Shanghai really feels like the centre of the world these days.

Worst thing about living in China?
The air pollution and the very oily food.

 

Katie F, New Zealand

Chinese level at the time of application?
Minimal – simple sentences – had done a round of night classes at Wellington High.

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute at the University of Auckland

Studied at which university?
Fudan University

What did the scholarship application process involve?
Had to write a letter stating why I wanted the scholarship, needed references from two people.

Why do you think you got accepted?
Had a slightly different profile – working in the media as opposed to the majority of people who apply who are fresh grads, also I’d already had an internship from a related organisation in Shanghai.

What did the scholarship include?
Free private room in university dorms and tuition for a year, 1,700RMB (~$275USD) monthly stipend, free books, free health insurance.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
Short monthly reports during the scholarship, one-page report post scholarship

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Make sure you have good references to vouch for you. In my opinion the most important aspect of the application letter is showing how valuable you will be in the future with this experience under your belt.

Best thing about living in China?
Really feeling like you live at the centre of the universe. Everything is happening there.

Worst thing about living in China?
Pollution, environmental degradation, poverty can be difficult to deal with.

 

Fredrika W, Sweden

Chinese level at the time of application?
Some conversational skills, quite poor reading and writing.

Organisation applied through?
The Nordic Confucius Institute in Stockholm, Sweden

Studied at which university?
Fudan University

What did the scholarship application process involve?
I needed to participate in a national competition with performances in Chinese. Based on pronunciation and language skills in the competition you could win one-years language scholarship to any University in China as long as you got accepted to the University. The University application required 2 recommendation letters and a personal letter from me (in Mandarin).

Why do you think you got accepted?
Fudan has in the past accepted a lot of the students who won this competition in Sweden. The recommendation letters were well-written, my personal letter was translated into proper flawless Mandarin and was very complimentary towards both the university and the country.

What did the scholarship include?
Tuition fees, dormitory fees for the 4-bedroom rooms and a monthly allowance of 1700 Yuan (~$275) and free books at the beginning of the term.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
No following obligations.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Show that you’re very open-minded towards the culture, enthusiastic about the language and show your passion about your studies.

Best thing about living in China?
I can only comment that living in Shanghai was fantastic. Great, vibrant city with great restaurants and an exciting night-life with a lot of opportunities to meet people. Also the low living cost and good opportunities to travel in Asia.

Worst thing about living in China?
The pollution, the immense culture shock, the difficulty of sorting anything out in the beginning if you don’t speak Mandarin and have no one to help you.

 

Elena M, Spain

Chinese level at the time of application?
HSK 2 (I was placed in class C and the top level is J).

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute, Madrid

Studied at which university?
Fudan University.

What did the scholarship application process involve?
I had to write a one page essay about why I wanted to obtain the scholarship, send two recommendation letters, and pass all medical exams to fill in the medical report.

Why do you think you got accepted?
First of all I think my chances increased for being a student of the Confucius Institute in Madrid and having studied there for two years. Also I had passed the HSK 2 with a very high mark and participated in the Chinese Bridge competition. Moreover, I had spent two summers in China studying Chinese and my final degree dissertation was about translation from Chinese to Spanish. All of this accredited my interest in China and Chinese culture, which I think is what they value the most, your background and past experiences.

What did the scholarship include?
Tuition for a year, private room in university dorms, month allowance of 1700 RMB (~$275 USD) plus 500RMB on the first months of the semester to cover books and school material, free health insurance, a night tour on a boat in the Huangpu river.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
None. All I had to do was write a few lines every month just to confirm that everything was going OK.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
The most important thing is show your interest, but being interested is not enough: you need to prove it! Taking Chinese classes? Joined activities related to Chinese culture? Anything is okay but it’s always better if you have some title, especially from the Confucius Institute.

Best thing about living in China?
Being able to talk Chinese in your daily life and getting to know people from all over the world.

Worst thing about living in China?
Pollution.

 

Chia L, Canada

Chinese level at the time of application?
Intermediate.

Organisation applied through?
China scholarship program through the Canadian Government

Studied at which university?
Fudan University.

What did the scholarship application process involve?
Letter on why I wanted the scholarship, references, copy of academic records and application form.

Why do you think you got accepted?
Had experience with China and wanted to improve my Chinese.

What did the scholarship include?
Tuition fees, housing and monthly stipend.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
None.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Follow application instructions and have a good letter.

Best thing about living in China?
Scooters.

Worst thing about living in China?
Pollution.

 

Liyo G, Belgium

Chinese level at the time of application?
Good (HSK level 5).

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute in Brussels

Studied at which university?
Fudan University.

What did the scholarship application process involve?
A letter in Chinese, my academic records, and a reference from a Chinese teacher.

Why do you think you got accepted?
Because my Chinese was already at a good level and there weren’t many other applicants.

What did the scholarship include?
School fees, a room at the dorms, a monthly income of around 1,700RMB (~$275 USD).

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
There was nothing afterwards, but we had to fill forms every month during the scholarship, and of course attend classes.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Maybe try and pass an HSK exam, even if it’s just the first level.

Best thing about living in China?
Chinese people.

Worst thing about living in China?
Chinese people.

 

Liang C, New Zealand

Chinese level at the time of application?
Low. Could say hello, goodbye, eat and sleep.

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute at the University of Auckland

Studied at which university?
Sun Yat Sen University, Guangzhou.

What did the scholarship application process involve?
An application letter along with two references. One academic, one someone you know.

Why do you think you got accepted?
Had been involved with a conference related to Chinese New Zealanders. Had a high academic record.

What did the scholarship include?
Free shared twin room, monthly living allowance or 1700RMB (~$275 USD) and tuition fees. Free health insurance. Had to pay for books and transportation.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
A one page report detailing my experiences.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Get involved in Chinese community events and have great academic references.

Best thing about living in China?
The hub of all things created. You can buy anything that you are looking for.

Worst thing about living in China?
A lot of fake products. Bad manners of many people.

 

Stephanie Z, Australia

Chinese level at the time of application?
Somewhere between beginner and intermediate, I had taken 3 subjects at uni.

Organisation applied through?
China Scholarship Council via the University of Sydney.

Studied at which university?
Fudan University.

What was the process for your application?
Two references, statement of purpose, transcript, CV.

Why do you think you got accepted?
Showed a demonstrated interest in Chinese studies and furthering my language skills.

What did the scholarship include?
Free private room in university dorms, free tuition for 6 months (1 semester), around monthly 1700RMB (~$275USD) stipend, free health insurance.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
Nothing.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Be authentic and thorough in your application, and try to learn some Chinese before you apply!

Best thing about living in China?
It’s dynamic, fast paced and always challenging.

Worst thing about living in China?
Pollution, traffic.

 

Ambra A, Italy

Chinese level at the time of application?
Intermediate.

Organisation applied through?
Chinese Government Scholarship Council – EU window

Studied at which university?
Fudan University

What was the process for your application?
3 reference letters, online applications, health exams, statement of purpose.

Why do you think you got accepted?
A good statement of purpose and high grades.

What did the scholarship include?
School fees, a room at the dorms and a monthly stipend of 1,700 RMB (~$275 USD)

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
During the year I had to write a report every month.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Carefully follow the application requirements and checklist.

Best thing about living in China?
Cheap cost of living, good food, Shanghai is a fun city to live abroad in.

Worst thing about living in China?
Quality of life, including the pollution.

 

Daniel E, New Zealand

Chinese level at the time of application?
Could comfortably converse in Mandarin on a range of topics, send and receive instant messages and texts and handwrite to a basic level.

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute at the University of Auckland

Studied at which university?
Beijing Language and Culture University

What was the process for your application?
I had to write a letter outlining both my experience and interests in China and Chinese as well as my future goals and aspirations to do with China.

Why do you think you got accepted?
I believe it was because I could demonstrate both strong results in language learning via awards, speech competitions and a Daoming Scholarship. Also in my deliberate and driven involvement in the local Chinese language community. These in concert with a demonstrated desire to further my language ability and be involved in China in the future.

What did the scholarship include?
Tuition fees at one of the approved institutes for one year of language studies, course materials were provided for, accommodation (student dormitories, in most instances shared and fairly basic but can upgrade if you are happy to top up with your own money), health services/insurance and a monthly stipend of 1700 RMB (~$275 USD).

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
Write a mid-term and full-term report outlining our experience in China, how we found the application and administration of the scholarship and such-like.

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
You need to do everything you can to demonstrate your dedication to China, Chinese language and culture and the people of China.

They’ll also be looking keenly for indications of your future plans and how they involve China, obviously the stronger and more strategic the better.

Finally, what I did and I believe it helped with my application was to write the letter in Mandarin (I of course got a friend to check grammar etc). I believe this helped leave a positive impression of my intentions and commitment.

Best thing about living in China?
The people, the language, the mysterious charm in the Chinese way of doing things.

Worst thing about living in China?
Food safety, when you don’t quite “get it” (language or cultural norms), the public toilets (always have some tissues or paper and hand sanitiser on you).

 

Lydia E, Germany

Chinese level at the time of application?
Advanced (HSK Level 5).

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute at the Goethe University in Frankfurt

Studied at which university?
Fudan university

What was the process for your application?
I had to write a motivation letter, fill in application forms and get two references.

Why do you think you got accepted?
I think I got accepted because I’d participated in Hanyuqiao before and also already taken the HSK exam (I had also visited some classes in the Confucius Institute itself).

What did the scholarship include?
Free tuition, free room in the students dorm, 1400 RMB (~$230 USD) monthly stipend, discount for books and health insurance.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
The Confucius Institute wanted me to write a report about my experiences in Shanghai and also to prepare a presentation (which was held in the Institute).

What tips would you give to people applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Personally, I think it is important to show interest in Chinese language and culture. It would be advantageous to visit classes in the Confucius Institute in advance and if you have already studied Chinese for a certain period of time, maybe also try to take an HSK exam, even if it’s just the first level.

Best thing about living in China?
This was already my second time of living in China- I have lived in Beijing before. I think it was great to experience another city. (I realized that I liked both, maybe because they are so different.) And also, it was amazing to get to know so many people from different countries. Another positive point is that most of the things you can do in your spare time are so cheap and you could live rather low-budget.

Worst thing about living in China?
I think the worst thing about living there (and which is also the reason why I wouldn’t want to spend more time there than a year) is that you have to worry about what you eat because you could really get problems with impure food (visiting doctors there is not fun – Western doctors are quite expensive and Chinese health facilities are anything but recommendable). Also, the quality of tap water and air is really bad (whereas I have the impression that all this is better in Taiwan).

 

Lisi H, Switzerland

Chinese level at the time of scholarship application?
Good listening comprehension (maybe HSK 4). Slow speaking due to limited vocab as I hadn’t spoken for a long time. No reading or writing skills.

Organisation applied through?
Swiss Chinese embassy

Studied at which university?
Fudan University

What was the process for your application?
Letters of recommendation, health examination, proof of English level, university diploma.

Why do you think you got accepted?
Due to my Chinese heritage (I am half Chinese), recommendation letters, maybe my personal working goals.

What did the scholarship include?
Free tuition fees, books, health insurance and accommodation for one year. Monthly stipend.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
None?

What tips would you give to someone applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Stress your relation to China and explain in which way you could help bring more cultural understanding/exchange between the West and China. This is why they provide scholarships.

Best thing about living in China?
Meeting people from around the world, experiencing Chinese traditions meeting Western modernity.

Affordable lifestyle including taxis, food from around the world, crazy clubs, spas & massages.

Freedom of choice about what kind of life you want to live with the difference in living costs between Chinese and Western life. In Shanghai there is something for everyone.

Worst thing about living in China?
Everything and everyone is extremely loud, bad traffic, food quality differs very much, very bad air quality.

 

Chris H, England

Chinese level at the time of application?
Could have a basic conversation but not about anything complex and specific.

Organisation applied through?
Confucius Institute at the University of Nottingham

Studied at which university?
Fudan University

What was the process for your application?
Had to write a letter stating why I wanted the scholarship, needed references from two people.

Why do you think you got accepted?
I was a little surprised actually as I had originally been told they were only looking for people who’d passed at least HSK 3. I think I was chosen partly as I was in my final year of university so they knew I was more likely to accept the offer rather than reject it and continue university.

What did the scholarship include?
Free private room in university dorms and tuition for a year, 1,700RMB monthly stipend, free books, free health insurance.

What were your obligations after the scholarship?
May have been asked to submit a report but was never asked for it or told where to submit it.

What tips would you give to someone applying for the scholarship to improve their chance of being accepted?
Try to show why you are interested in learning the language, e.g. what you plan to do after the course in China, to show you are committed. Also, when studying in China, what you put in is what you get out, put effort into studying but also getting out and using Chinese in everyday life. Don’t hang around with people who speak English for most of the time.

Best thing about living in China?
The huge and interesting difference in culture and life style, also the chance to travel all over the country and elsewhere in Asia.

Worst thing about living in China?
The apparent difference in logic and manners but you get used to it.


Questions? Leave a comment! I’ll see if myself or someone I know can answer it 🙂

And one final tip: If your country wasn’t listed above, just Google search for a Confucius Institute in your country/city. They can probably tell you everything you need to know.

祝你好运!

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60 thoughts on “Study Chinese in China for a year…for free!

      1. Went to their page but unfortunately most pages seem to be missing. Sad. I’m really interested in studying Chinese because, like you, I love languages.

        1. Hi Johann, try making some phone calls and asking, it tends to work a little differently country to country. Unfortunately there’s a little political tension between China and the Philippines right now so that may affect things. Hopefully not!

    1. It depends where you are. Just contact the Confucius Institute near you and ask for scholarship information. They should be able to tell you everything you need to know. Then follow the tips above when it comes to putting your application together.

  1. Hi! Thanks for this blog post! Do you know if you have to be applying for a degree programme to be eligible? If I were to apply for a one-year language programme would I still be considered?

    1. Hi Winnie, I’m not quite sure what you mean. The scholarship is for one-year language study in China. If you mean do you need to be a degree student to apply, I think it will vary. Best check with the Confucius Institute in your country.

    1. Search for a Confucius Institute near your city/university. They are all over America. Send them an email and ask about Conficius Scholarships. There are definitely American recipients, just none that I really befriended. Good luck!

  2. Hi Bren

    Thanks for the tips here. I’m going to apply for the scholarship, but just wondering where did you get the medical check up required, since I have to supply the medical report before I’ll be considered for the scholarship? Also, did you have to do another check-up when you started studying on top of the one you already did to be considered for the scholarship?

    Thanks
    Liz

    1. Hi Liz,

      I just got the checkup at my local GP. It’s nothing complicated. And yes, when I started studying in Shanghai, I needed to get another checkup, but the university arranged all of that (the medical van comes to the school and takes your blood etc, it’s all part of orientation week). Good luck with the application!

  3. Im in my mid forties I live in montengro i speak english and serbian some spanish but i would love to learn mandrin is there anyway i can learn the language my english is fluent I would even teach some for an opportunity , if anyone can help guide me in the right direction I would appreciate it…..thanks…d

    1. It will largely depend on the Confucius Institute rules in your country, but in most cases no, you don’t need to be a student. I’d Google the closest Confucius Institute to your city and give them a call to find out the specifics.

  4. Have passed this on to my daughter. She has studied Mandarin as part of her International Baccalaureate for the last 2 years. She is off to university in September but wants to study or work in China afterwards.
    Guess I’m too old and long out of university?

  5. hi,
    am so flattered about this opportunity to learn Chinese and am interested in this chance….how can i start off every thing because am in Uganda East africa

  6. Hello, I live in the US. There is a Confucius Institute in my state of Iowa, but I’m in college at Iowa State University, NOT the University of Iowa. I am more than willing to go but I don’t know how to proceed. Tips?

  7. Hey Bren,
    I’m finishing study at the University of Auckland but I find myself not knowing any lecturers personally enough to ask for a reference (let’s just say I’m more of the self-study kind and not a person who goes to office hours!). Are there other ways we can get a reference rather than an academic one? If I was attending Chinese classes would my teacher count as one?
    Cheers!

    1. I believe one needs to be a university lecturer. I would just go to the lecturer of the paper you got the best grade in and ask. If you explain the situation I’m sure they’ll oblige. You could also include an additional one from your Chinese teacher though – it can’t hurt!

  8. This is very helpful! Thank you for posting this information. I will be studying at Fudan for one year with the language. I applied for the scholarship directly to the Embassy than the Confucius Institute and just was sent my acceptance letter 2 weeks ago. I am excited to start my experience at Fudan than pay 3x the amount for a study abroad program in the United States.

  9. Hello there :)!
    Really really interesting article!!! I would loooooooove to use this great opportunity and go study Chinese in China for one year, but my Chinese skills equal almost zero. Although you said that it would be possible to participate in the program without profund knowledge of the language, on the official sites it states that you must pass the HSK exam. (Applicants should have achieved a score of at least 180 on the HSK exam (level 3) or a score of at least 60 on the SKK exam (primary level).)
    So how did it work for you, since you just started learning it? Are the guidelines stricter this year or is it overall not as strict as they state, which is why an exam is not necessary?
    Many thanks in advance and kind regards! 🙂

    1. I actually did the NZ-China scholarship, which is also listed on that page with slightly different conditions. As for the Vienna one it looks like you need some proficiency, so you may need to take local classes for a semester before applying.

  10. Thanks alot for such nice information. I desperately want to learn chines as i m fond of learning different languages but unfortunately for Pakistan I am unable to find any opportunity of scholarship.
    Kindly guide me.

  11. Hi , How are you?I would like to know I am Bangladeshi and working in Indonesia as a marketing manager and i would like to study Mandarin for business purpose…if i wanna get scholarship or 3 months exchange students culture to study Mandarin .Is this possible?

  12. Hi Bren! I think your website is fantastic, thanks fro the amount of tips. They are very handy. My situation here; I am moving to china this march, going to Shanghai ( really excited) and I was looking for a scholarship, the ones I saw so far are in Beijiing. Could you please help me here and let me know if you know of any scholarship in Shanghai for spanish citizens? I am from barcelona. Thank you!

      1. Thanks for your reply. I already knew about the scholarship from Confucius, but they usually give them to the their students, and I am studying in another academy ( I will try anyway). If you happen to know anything else, could you let me know please? Thank you!

  13. Hi,

    Thanks for the tips.
    I’m from Jakarta, Indonesia, and I don’t understand how to apply.
    Could you help me finding out how to apply?
    Thank you~~

  14. I called up the nearest Confucius Institute in Manila and they said it’s necessary that you take the Level 3 HSK and Beginner Level HSKK (both with a minimum grade requirement) before you even think about applying. I guess the admissions procedure was quite different a few years ago. Sadly though, I missed the deadline and they only administer them 3 times a year. So then I decided to take the tests in Vancouver instead where they hold the tests almost every month, would that mean I’m up against more people for the scholarship?

    1. I have no idea, criteria is different everywhere. But HSK3 really isn’t hard to pass, you could pass it after 3 months of study quite easily.

  15. Hi, Thanks for the friendly blog. I spent last couple of hours googling loads of info from various universities and the govt. scholarships but oh god, there’s piles of jargon there ! your blog is informative, and understandable and simply put, amazing. thank you !
    Now, my qn is I am already in Shanghai and want to just do a language course. IMMENSELY interested. Already done HSK1 in India before I came here. However, I haven’t given the exam HSK1 cos my expensive-yet-inefficient institute there didn’t provide it. So I can speak HSK1 level, can’t read or write since the stupid institute taught in pinyin. I just want to do the language course and build my skills as I love the culture and everything associated with language and also need it for my work. I am a MBA Myself from India. Could you help me with my unique situation ? What to do, pointers ahead, anything would help… I just want the scholarship to master the language.

    And I agree, its been a few months already and the city is awesome 🙂

    Thanks a lot !

      1. Umm… I didn’t know where to apply. Since you have stayed in Shanghai, I thought maybe you would know where to apply. There’s too much information on the official sites of the multiple universities.. Its kinda confusing. Was hoping you could tell me where to start off with… 🙂

        1. Everything I know is in the article sorry. Your best bet is to contact the China Scholarship Council or the Confucius Institute in your home country. Good luck!

  16. please I am from Ghana and I am so eager to learn the culture and language of China and probably stay to teach Chinese children both Chinese language and English

  17. Please I am in Lesotho and there are no better shops here except for those owned and ran by Chinese. I would love to study Chinese and apply for a job in their work areas.

  18. Am a Nigerian i will like to learn Chinese and also continue my study in there country up to Phd level.Can i get a scholarship for Chinese language ? where can i apply in Nigeria? Thanks

  19. Hello, I am from Slovakia so I can use EU Program, but I checked also the webpage of the University and I am not sure to which program apply – there is a wide range of non-degree programs but which to choose when I want to study Chinese intensively?

    Thanks 🙂

    1. It should be clear which is the language program. I’m not familiar with each country’s rules so you should call the Institute and ask.

  20. Hi and thank you for your good and clear guidance!
    Please tell me for studying Chinese language in China how can I apply in Iran?
    and Thanks

  21. Hi there
    I am really glad to find your website
    your information about a scholarship in China are absolutely helpful
    I am really avid of learning Chinese language. With over a billion population there is ranked as the second country regarding the best economy. it is wonderful
    I tried to get a scholarship for a year studying Chinese language in China last year, but I couldnt unfortunately. However, I am trying for 2017 again, because I am serious about it.
    Could you please help me in this way?

  22. How can i apply this scholership.l have statistics special degree and i want to learn mandarin. please give me a chance

  23. I am graduating from school and I am really fond of foreign languages and I would love to study Chinese in China. I also have a fee language partners. And my nationality is Indian. so do you think, you know about any scholarship for a noob like me ?
    please reply.

  24. Wanted to study Mandarin in Yiwu China. May I know if there is any language center or college that offer minimal fees and dormitory.

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